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Home » Our Practice » Patient FAQ’s

Patient FAQ’s

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We want to make sure that you receive all of the information that you need to make educated decisions about your eye health. Our eye doctors are always available to answer your questions. Please feel free to send us your eye care questions to southcoweyecare@gmail.com


Q: What to do if my contact lens gets stuck in my eye?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

Q: What can I do about my allergies and itchy eyes?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: If I am diabetic, how often do i need to get my eyes checked?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: Why do we need regular eye exams?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: What Can I Do To Keep My Eyes Healthy?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: Do My kids really need to wear sunglasses too?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: Are Multi-focal Contact Lenses For Me?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: Why Do I Need Sunglasses?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: What is Glaucoma?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: Is it safe for my eyes to use eye makeup?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: What is presbyopia?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: When should my child have his/her first eye exam?

A: Watch Dr. Hewitt's response:

 

Q: How do Cataracts develop and is there anything I can do to avoid them?

A: Watch Dr. Hewitt's response:

 

Q: My eyelashes are very sparse. Is there any treatment available for this?

Dr. Hewitt: Yes! If you have sparse eyelashes you may have a condition called hypotrichosis. Eyelash hypotrichosis is a condition in which there is little or no lash growth on the eyelid. Lashes can also be lost due to chemotherapy or a condition called alopecia. There is a treatment for increasing the length, thickness, and darkness of eyelashes. Latisse is applied twice daily and results in longer more abundant lashes. Thought the exact mechanism is unknown, it is thought that the active ingredient in Latisse, Bimatoprost, causes lash follicles to remain in the growth phase for longer periods of time. Latisse is applied nightly to the upper eyelid using applicators that are supplied with the drop. Most people will begin to see a result in about 2 months. Lashes will continue to grow while taking Latisse and will go back to their original state if Latisse is stopped. Because the lashes continue to grow, some patients may need to have their lashes trimmed. About 4% of patients taking Latisse noticed increased eye redness or irritation that went away with discontinuation of the drop. Some other possible side effects include potential darkening of the skin around the lashes, which is reversible with discontinuation of drug, and darkening of the iris. Increased iris pigmentation is not reversible. If you are interested in Latisse, ask your eye care professional about it. Though there are no contraindications for Latisse, it can affect eye pressure and can interfere with drops used for controlling eye pressure so you should always see an eye doctor before and while using Latisse.

One example of this is glaucoma. Glaucoma is a condition where the optic nerve slowly dies. It affects the peripheral vision first and then the central vision. Patients do not typically notice any vision loss until 40-60% of the nerve is gone. Once gone, we can't get those nerve fibers back. However, we are very good at preventing nerve fiber loss if we catch glaucoma early. Bottom line is, when it comes to vision, we are a lot better at preventing loss than getting it back once it's gone.

Protecting your vision aside, eye exams are also good for your overall health. During an eye exam, we are actually looking inside an organ (your eye), and anything that can affect the body can also effect the eye. Eye doctors are often the first to catch signs of diabetes, multiple sclerosis, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, brain tumors or aneurysms, and much more. In many of these cases, patients come in for their annual eye exam without any visual problems. In the same way that we can see the first signs of a disease, we can also help to monitor an existing disease, like diabetes. Lastly, vision loss can be a very slow and gradual process, and it is not as apparent as one may think. Many people think their vision is fine when it isn't, and it's during their routine eye exam that it is revealed.

 

Q: My vision is perfect. Why do I need to have an eye exam?

Dr. Hewitt: Even if you have perfect vision it is important to have an eye exam in order to check on the overall health of the eye. It's kind of like having that yearly physical, just to make sure everything is functioning properly and to identify potential risk factors for disease. Many eye related disease have little to no symptoms until the disease process is well underway, and more often than not, there are ways to manage these eye disease and maintain vision if caught early enough.

One example of this is glaucoma. Glaucoma is a condition where the optic nerve slowly dies. It affects the peripheral vision first and then the central vision. Patients do not typically notice any vision loss until 40-60% of the nerve is gone. Once gone, we can't get those nerve fibers back. However, we are very good at preventing nerve fiber loss if we catch glaucoma early. Bottom line is, when it comes to vision, we are a lot better at preventing loss than getting it back once it's gone.

Protecting your vision aside, eye exams are also good for your overall health. During an eye exam, we are actually looking inside an organ (your eye), and anything that can affect the body can also effect the eye. Eye doctors are often the first to catch signs of diabetes, multiple sclerosis, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disorders, brain tumors or aneurysms, and much more. In many of these cases, patients come in for their annual eye exam without any visual problems. In the same way that we can see the first signs of a disease, we can also help to monitor an existing disease, like diabetes. Lastly, vision loss can be a very slow and gradual process, and it is not as apparent as one may think. Many people think their vision is fine when it isn't, and it's during their routine eye exam that it is revealed.

 

Q: I've heard that blue light is damaging to the eyes. Is this correct, and is there anything I can do to prevent this damage from happening?

Dr. Hewitt: Recent studies have shown that visible blue-violet light (between 380-455nm) can be damaging to ocular structures. It can cause early cataracts, retinal cell damage, and even accelerate macular degeneration. It's thought that because blue violet light is right next to ultra violet light on the electromagnetic spectrum, blue violet light may have similar effects on our eyes as UV rays. Frequent use of devices like smart phones, tablets, computers, and LED lights (all sources of blue light) increase our exposure to blue-violet light. Not all blue light is harmful however. Blue-turquoise light (455-500nm) helps regulate our sleep and wake cycles, so we do need some exposure to things like a blue sky. Luckily, there are some solutions to decrease exposure to the blue-violet light. Lens manufacturer's have come up with coatings that block just the blue-violet light and let the blue turquoise light in. This way color vision is preserved and the lenses still appear clear. Yellow tinted computer lenses are also a good option, however these lenses will affect color vision.

 

Q: Why Do My Eyes Twitch?

A: Watch Dr. Miranda's response:

 

Q: My Grandmother has Macular Degeneration and has extremely low vision, is there anything available to help her?

A: Watch Dr. Hewitt's response: